The tech-rich social studies classroom

Building a differentiation & personalization toolkit

tech-rich social studiesI was privileged recently to work with a number of pre-service teachers here at the University of Vermont. All were eager to gain access to tools and resources to help them respond to the variety of learners’ needs they will face in classrooms.

Using the Civil War as our (broad) topic, we developed a workflow for creating a tech-rich social studies unit responsive to different learners’ needs. And using ourselves as learners, we tested out our methods.

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How to fight fake news in the field

A case study from one classroom

how to fight fake newsIn part one, we explored how middle grade students are struggling to recognize fake news or sponsored posts and shared many tools for teachers looking to tackle this thorny issue.

But what does it really look like We sat down for a Q & A with Christie Nold, sixth grade educator and fighter of fake news.

Here’s her mini-unit on telling real from fake news.

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Too much good stuff: a wealth of reading and curation resources for the classroom

The technology cannot thwart us, it can only make us stronger

Susan Hennessey, professional development coordinator

I talk with my hands.

As many of you are aware, I was out at Harwood Union High School this past week for the Washington West Supervisory Union (WWSU) inservice day, armed to the teeth with iPads, apps, and tips and tricks for integrating technology into the classroom in a thoughtful, comprehensive and device-agnostic way.

Well, Harwood’s wi-fi network took one look at my plans and passed out cold, a victim of shock and awe, I’m sure!

As I have no wish to cause the wi-fi further damage, let me present all my resources to you here in the pages of our very own Tarrant Institute blog.

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Differentiated social reading with Subtext

Make the most of Subtext’s capacity for differentiated reading

How to app-smash with SubtextA-reading we will go, A-reading we will go, hey ho the dairy-o, a reading we will go!

Ahem.

We’re going to take a look at the free iOS app Subtext, which provides a host of tools that let you empower readers in your classroom while providing them with maximal scaffolding for success. Subtext was really designed to differentiate the process of close reading, letting readers respond to stories with comments and even photos uploaded from their Camera Roll.

Two other huge benefits of the Subtext app are that you, as the educator can set up virtual reading groups within your classroom and you can also pull webpages and pdfs into Subtext, to capture the types of digital texts that a lot of 21st century learners like to read. Let’s go through how to get set up with Subtext.

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